Cooking Glossary – All About You Need for Cooking in Kitchen

COOKING GLOSSARY….

Au gratin………. dish topped with breadcrumbs or grated cheese, cooked in the oven and/or finished off under the grill until golden brown and toasted.

Beat……….to beat with a rotary beater, fork or a spoon any liquid or semi-liquid food with the purpose of mixing that particular item of food thoroughly and making it smooth and free of any lumps.

Blend………..to combine several ingredients together till smooth.

Boil…………to heat liquid until bubbles appear on the surface and vapour starts rising.

Blanch………cover nuts or tomatoes or whatever you want  to blanch with boiling water  and then after some time put it in cold water so the skin breaks. Then peel off the skin.

Batter………..is a mixture of flour and liquid. The consistency of the batter is such that it can be stirred with a spoon and is thin enough to pour or drop from the spoon.

Chill………to cool food by placing it either in the fridge or on the ice.

Chop……..to cut food into pieces.

Combine………..to mix two or more ingredients together.

Dissolve……..to melt required ingredients in liquid.

Drain……..to free the food completely from liquid

Deep fry…………to fry in plenty of oil or fat

Dough……… a mixture of flour and liquid and other ingredients as required. A dough is thick is thick enough to knead or roll, but it is too stiff to stir or pour.

Fry……….to cook food in oil or any fat till it turns brown.

Garnish……….to decorate food.

Garlic flake………..an individual piece in a pod of garlic.

Grate………..to rub food into fine strips on a grater.

Grind……….to reduce food to a paste.

Gravy……….liquid in which food is cooked.

Knead……..work on dough with hands pressing, stretching, folding and punching till it turns smooth.

Line……….. cover the inside of a dish, bowl or mould with paper, pastry, gelatine etc.

Melt……….to heat until the ingredients are changed from solid to liquid.

Mince……..to chop food as finely as possible.

Parboil………. cook partially to soften in boiling water before proceeding to cook in another manner.

Peel………to remove skin of vegetables or fruits.

Purèe……….. mashed and creamed vegetables, or cooked fruit.

Roll……….to place a ball of dough on a flat board and roll it out in any shape you require with the help of a rolling pin.

Sift……….to separate coarse pieces from flour etc. by shaking through a sieve.

Seasonings or Spices……….aromatic dried herbs and spices used to increase the taste and appearance of food.

Shred……….to cut food into small, long and narrow strips.

Squeeze………to takeout the liquid from food by crushing or pressing.

Simmer……….to cook food just below the boiling point.

Soak………to cover food with liquid.

Shallow fry……….to fry food in a little oil or fat till golden brown.

Steam……….to steam food is to cook food by means of steam generated by boiling water. The food does not come in contact with water. This is a much better method than boiling because in this method all the important nutrients are retained in the food.

Stew………. cook slowly, simmering with liquid in a covered casserole.

Whisk…….. beat rapidly until smooth and frothy.

 

Written by

RFPL

Indian spices have been famed throughout the world since times immemorial and have been closely associated with cultural traditions, magic, preservation, medicine and embalming. Spices of India have found mention 7000 years ago in the ancient civilisations of Egypt, Mesopotamia, Sumeria, Arabia and China, far before the Greek and Roman civilisations came into being. In fact, India’s history has been re-scripted by the Europeans’ quest for our famed spices.

At Ramdev, we understand the splendour that Indian spices have stood for through many millennia and count ourselves amongst the custodians of this great heritage. For half a century, through the purity and quality of our spices, we have reiterated the sobriquet of ‘Spice Land’ for India. Our business footprint and loyal customers across the world are our testimonials for consistently delivering the finest grade of spices in multifarious forms year after year.